The little things in life

Today is still Remembrance Day in Canada, and I spent the whole day being thankful. Because of all the war heroes and veterans before us, I could wake up in Peace.

As I went to a local diner today for breakfast, everyone was wearing a poppy, the kind that you lose 6 seconds after you buy one and if you don’t lose it, it stabs you. I tend to purchase about 3-4 a year.

I wore a red sweater in case I lost my last one again in support and I was pleased to look around at the diner patrons sporting poppies and red shirts, hats, poppies, and some jackets.

IMG_4267.JPG

I had breakfast with my mom, and when her plate came out, I had to snap a picture of it. It was perfect.

As we were eating and chatting, we lost track of time and it was soon 11am.

One of the servers clanged a coffee pot and requested a moment of silence. You could have heard a pin drop, the noisy diner with a long line up to get in was silent as we all took a moment to remember why we were there. Why any one of us were.

I felt proud to be a Canadian at that moment. I was not at the Cenotaph, but my thankfulness is still the same.

My family and I are safe, because of all the people before us. A perfect moment in a small town diner, it’s the little things in life.

Lest We Forget.

Lest We Forget

November 11th,  our national day of Remembrance. We are ever thankful.lest-we-forget

I think every child raised in Canada still remembers Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s poem ” In Flander’s Fields”. But in case you do not, here it is:

” In Flanders fields the poppies blow
      Between the crosses, row on row,
   That mark our place; and in the sky
   The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
   Loved and were loved, and now we lie
         In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
   The torch; be yours to hold it high.
   If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
         In Flanders fields.” 

To learn more about John McCrae, please visit our National Veterans Affairs website